DELSA - Digital Empowerment for Digitally Upskilling Adults

4B Protecting Personal Data and Privacy


COU_10_EN  

 Title
4B Protecting Personal Data and Privacy

 Keywords
Personal data, Privacy, GDPR, Reputation, copryright, Intellectual property

 Author
IHF

 Languages
English

 Objectives/goals
This unit identifies: the basic principles that distinguish Personal Data from Sensitive Data; the new European policies on Privacy and Data processing; the Intellectual Property subject and the main forms of protection


 Description
This unit indicates the main topics on digital privacy, digital safety and digital privacy normative

 Contents in bullet points
● Personal Data vs Sensitive Data: A Personal Data is an information that tracks down traits and features related to an identified or identifiable individual person – even indirectly, by referring to any other indication. A Sensitive Data is a Personal Data that holds a stronger law protection and needs to be processed with extra caution measures, upon specific approval of the subject which that data refers to. ● Digital Identity vs Digital Reputation The way we act, what we say, how we say it, and what we do to portrait out our values online is what systematically defines our Digital Identity. One’s reputation simply displays and reveals what the others think about him/her and his/her overall perception. ● GDPR GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) is a very recent EU regulation – fully into application across the European territory since May 2018 – that strictly regulates “the processing by an individual, a company or an organisation of personal data relating to individuals in the EU”. ● Intellectual Properties ● “…refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names, and images used in commerce”.


 Contents


 4B Protecting Personal Data and Privacy: Safety

Personal vs Sensitive Data – How to Protect them


  Personal Data

A Personal Data is an information that tracks down traits and features related to an identified or identifiable individual person – even indirectly, by referring to any other indication. Typical identifiers are:

    - Name

    - Locations

    - Data

    - Numbers

    - Online identifiers (IP address, GPS location, etc.)

A Personal Data might be intended also as a genetic, mental, economic, cultural and/or social factors, such as: residency address, credit card number, full name and surname, email login data.



  Sensitive Data

On the other hand, a Sensitive Data is a Personal Data that holds a stronger law protection and needs to be processed with extra caution measures, upon specific approval of the subject which that data refers to.

In any other case, Sensitive Data remains inaccessible (except public authorities in specific cases).

Are to be considered as “Sensitive” all those information that fall under the following categories: racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs; Trade-union membership; Health-related data; a person’s sex life or sexual orientation, etc.

To recap, here’s a brief videoclip illustrating the values of our data and information for businesses related needs: 

 

 



  How to protect your data?

Being discreet and reserved when it comes to web, media and personal information is the very first rule.

Having complete awareness of whom is receiving our information, what kind of information are we giving and most importantly why they’re requested, is an always winning strategy.

However, obtaining this kind of knowledge is difficult, mostly because we can’t never be fully aware of the recipients of our data.

That’s why it is always a wise choice to take on these incredibly easy and super effective actions:

  • Social Media: Review privacy settings of your accounts.
  • Password: Make sure you have strong and hard to detect passwords.
  • Smartphone: Lock your Apps, hide your photos and turn off screen notifications.
  • Secret your browsing or, even better, consider to adopt a VPN (virtual private network) provider.
  • If possible, try to avoid public Wi-Fis and never insert personal data in any website when connected to a public Wi-Fi.
  • Choose very carefully the document destinated to public/online/cloud storages.
 

Additionally, thanks to a little browsing it is possible to stump into useful tips: click here



Manage one’s Digital Identity and Reputation


  What is Digital Identity?

The way we act, what we say, how we say it, and what we do to portrait out our values online is what systematically defines our Digital Identity.

Our Digital Identity is nothing but the mirror image of our image overall: a reflection of core beliefs, ideals and visions that from the reality dimension move to the digital one.

To talk about Digital Identity means addressing the following questions:

  • Who we are?
  • How we do what we do?
  • Why we do that?

For Whom?

One’s reputation simply displays and reveals what the others think about him/her and his/her overall perception.

Reputation indicates how the general public perceive the values we communicate online and through our social media accounts.

The others’ perception may not correspond to the values we want to communicate.



  Digital Identity & Reputation

Needless to say that Digital Identity and Reputation figures as two incredibly valuable assets as much as any other tangible feature.

A strong Identity portrayed online translate into a solid impression in our daily life.

It’s important to design an online identity as close as possible to our real values, beliefs, attitudes.

For years Communication Scholars and Practioners defined a never-ending list of best practices and replicable approaches to preserve and reinforce what was first just known as “reputation” and then – with the passing years – “digital reputation”. The differences are minimum, considering the second as an unavoidable evolution of the first.

All of this corpus of results can be summed in few milestone points.

  • Be credible and trustworthy.
  • Engage constructive dialogues.
  • Accept negative feedback with maturity and wisdom.
  • Welcome the “diversity” and accept the risk of being misunderstood.
  • Talk with sincerity and respect to your digital interlocutors.
  • Listen closely to your environment and track down any warning/opportunity signal.


GDPR – EU regulations on data protection


  What is GDPR?

GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) is a very recent EU regulation – fully into application across the European territory since May 2018 – that strictly regulates “the processing by an individual, a company or an organisation of personal data relating to individuals in the EU”.

 The verb “processing” unequivocally refers to the: collection, recording, organisation, structuring, storage, adaptation (or alteration), retrieval, consultation, use, disclosure by transmission, dissemination (or otherwise making available), alignment or combination, restriction, erasure or destruction of personal data (https://ec.europa.eu/info/what-constitutes-data-processing_en)

GDPR is grounded on two fundamental principles:

  • Protecting common citizens from data abuse.
  • Empowering businesses from “a level playing field”.

 

What is GDPR?  The Business Perspective

GDPR represents a stringent set of “MUST DOs” in terms of:
  • Kind of data processable
  • Purpose of the processing
  • Amount of data collectable & Longevity of the data disposal
  • Communication of the collection, Obligations and overall fulfilment
  • Dealing with the citizens exercise of their right 

(For a comprehensive understanding: Rules for Business and Organizations)

 

What is GDPR?  The Citizens Perspective

On the other hand, GDPR shows itself as a strong protection mean against the privacy right and  the data processing abuse:
  • What is the exact object under protection and how it is exactly protected?
  • What are my rights?
  • How do I know if one of my rights is violated and what do I do to make it assert?
  • How do I get back in posses of my data?
  • When I should/shouldn’t exercises my rights?
  • Etc…For a comprehensive understanding: Rights for Citizens) 


IPR (Intellectual Property Rights) & Copyright


  Seeking a Definition:

According to WIPO (World intellectual Property Organization), intellectual property:

 “…refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and  artistic works; designs; and symbols, names, and images used in commerce”.

Such definition – intentionally so vague and general – includes all the possible way the human brain can come up with new and innovative expression of its creativity and intelligence.


  Types of intellectual property:

Fort the mentioned reason, each type of “mind-product” is destined to a specific type of protection:

•TRADEMARKS

“A trademark is a sign capable of distinguishing the goods or services of one enterprise from those of other enterprises” (WIPO).


•PATENT

“A patent is an exclusive right granted for an invention, which is a product or a process that provides, in general, a new way of doing something, or offers a new technical solution to a problem. To get a patent, technical information about the invention must be disclosed to the public in a patent application” (WIPO).


•INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

“Industrial designs are compositions of lines or colors or any three-dimensional forms which give a special appearance to a product or handicraft. They protect the ornamental or aesthetic aspect of a useful article, which usually appeals to the sense of sight or touch and can be reproduced in significant quantities” (WIPO).


•COPYRIGHT  

“Copyright (or author’s right) is a legal term used to describe the rights that creators have over their literary and artistic works. Works covered by copyright range from books, music, paintings, sculpture, and films, to computer programs, databases, advertisements, maps, and technical drawings” (WIPO).

Copyright covers a wide spectrum of necessities not to be found in any other part of Intellectual Property Rights legislation. The only field where Copyright finds no space is the abstract ideas, procedures and methods domain.

In fact, Copyright law is strictly referred to audio and visula ideas:

  • literary works (such as novels, poems, plays, reference works, newspaper articles).
  • computer programs, algorithms databases.
  • films, musical compositions, and choreography.
  • artistic works such as paintings, drawings, photographs.
  • Sculpture and architecture.
  • advertisements, maps, and technical drawings.
 

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